Peachy Stays

​​Introducing Peachy Stays – an exclusive bold collection of destinations designed to captivate and enchant the curious ones: those who crave magic, risk, novelty, and an insatiable desire for more. 

We invite you to feast your eyes on bold and authentic experiences, handpicked for their uniqueness and daring spirit. From hidden gems in remote corners of the world to unconventional lodgings that redefine luxury, we’ll recommend destinations which reflect the soul of those who dare to forge their own paths and embrace the extraordinary.

Peachy Stays is for the curious ones, the wanderers yearning for journeys that stir the soul and ignite the imagination. Join us on this extraordinary new voyage of discovery as we embrace the call of the unconventional, and embark on adventures that fulfil our longing for more.

For the first instalment of our marvellous brand new series, Peachy Stays heads out for a hedonistic, long-haul destination stunner with buckets of pzazz and some art thrown in for good measure.

The journey starts, so to speak, with a high speed catamaran ferry ride from Hobart, Tasmania’s capital. This scenic approach by water is an integral part of the experience, offering picturesque views of the River Derwent and the surrounding landscapes. Once docked, 99 steps await in the literal lead up to MONA.

MONA, is of course, Tasmania’s Museum of Old and New Art – a unique private museum that showcases an ultra diverse collection of contemporary art and antiquities from around the world. It features an eclectic mix of contemporary art installations, provocative exhibits, and ancient artefacts. Its collection spans various themes and genres, including interactive and digital art and thought-provoking sculptures – highlights include works by James Turrell, Matthew Barney, Ai WeiWei and a vulva wall by Jamie McCartney. The museum itself is carved into the cliffs of the Berriedale Peninsula where its underground galleries are connected by winding tunnels, creating a one-of-a-kind experience.

Besides the art, MONA also offers visitors an exclusive and opulent lodging option. MONA’s luxury accommodation pavilions offer a truly immersive experience – perched on the Derwent, they provide breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape and offer an exceptional blend of luxury, art, and nature.There are eight pavilions in total, each named after an influential Australian architect, adding an artistic touch to the accommodation experience. The pavilions feature sophisticated and contemporary designs, with attention to detail and amenities that ensure a comfortable and indulgent stay. Inside the pavilions, guests will find artworks from the MONA collection, making the accommodation itself an extension of the museum’s artistic ambiance. Each pavilion’s interior design complements the artistic theme associated with its namesake, creating a cohesive experience. Outside, the pavilions have private decks or terraces that offer a serene space to relax and take in the picturesque views of the River Derwent and the surrounding natural beauty. The tranquil setting allows guests to connect with nature while being surrounded by art. Staying in these luxury pavilions also comes with exclusive access to the museum outside its regular hours. This means guests can explore MONA’s art galleries privately, providing an extraordinary opportunity to engage with the art on a deeper level.

Julien Pacaud: of gods and men
Julien Pacaud: of gods and men

A wide range of amenities and attractions including a tennis court, library and iconic recording studio, cater to a diverse audience, ensuring a memorable and enjoyable visit beyond the art galleries. Located on-site, the Moorilla Winery is one of Tasmania’s oldest vineyards producing small-batch, premium wines made from estate-grown fruit. An extension of the Moorilla Estate, the Moo Brew-ery is well-regarded for its high-quality and innovative craft beers. It prides itself on producing a range of distinctive and flavorful beers that appeal equally to both enthusiasts and connoisseurs.

MONA has several dining and drinking options scattered throughout the museum grounds however, The Source – a temple to seasonal Tasmanian dining, is a must visit. Right atop the MONA, it offers sweeping views, living moss-and-herb tables, and an award-winning wine list. The restaurant’s focus is on using fresh, local, and seasonal ingredients to create exquisite dishes, making it a must for those ready to savour a true taste of Tasmania.

The super flash luxury dens at MONA offer a truly immersive and unforgettable experience, where guests can indulge in the ultimate blend of art, nature, and luxury. It’s an exceptional option for travellers seeking a unique and memorable stay enriched with artistic inspiration and luxurious comforts.

 

Julien Pacaud: of gods and men
Julien Pacaud: of gods and men

Words by Fabrizio Mifsud Soler.

mona.net.au

Images: Jesse Hunniford, Rémi Chauvin, Brett Boardman, courtesy of Mona, Hobart, Tasmania

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